The Unholy Trinity – Podcast

How the U.S. Defense Budget Shapes Foreign Policy

Col. James Hentz and Dr. Spencer Backich of VMI's international studies department talk with Maj. Sherri Tombarge about the U.S. defense budget and how it relates to America's foreign policy.
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Dr. James Hentz and Dr. Spencer Bakich of Virginia Military Institute's international studies department speak with Maj. Sherri Tombarge about the U.S. defense budget and how it relates to America's foreign policy, particularly in the context of China's growing economic and military strength. In Hentz’s “unholy trinity” model, the dynamics of fast money, slow money, and very slow money have real implications for U.S. standing in relation to China and other potential adversaries on the world stage.

Hentz is professor and head of the VMI Department of International Studies and Political Science. He is working on the book Wars Across States in Africa and is editor-in-chief of the quarterly journal African Security. He is also co-editor of a forthcoming book on Boko Haram.

Bakich is author of Success and Failure in Limited War: Information and Strategy in the Korean, Vietnam, Persian Gulf and Iraq Wars and teaches courses on topics including U.S.-China relations and America's national security policies.

More on This Topic

Hal Brands, What Good Is Grand Strategy? Power and Purpose in American Statecraft from Harry S. Truman to George W. Bush

Thomas J. Christensen, The China Challenge: Shaping the Choices of a Rising China

Eliot A. Cohen, Conquered into Liberty: Two Centuries of Battles along the Great Warpath that Made the American Way of War

Paul Kennedy, The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers:  Economic Change & Military Conflict from 1500 to 2000

Edward N. Luttwak, Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire: From the First Century CE to the Third

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